Egyptian Amulet with Seated Thoth

£550.00

A carved D-section pendant of Thoth, who is seated in ibis-headed form on a flat base. He wears a headdress depicting both the crescent and full moon. Thoth holds a crouched position, with his knees drawn to his chest. The beak of the ibis is clearly visible and aids identification. The reverse is undecorated.

 

Date: 664 - 332 BC
Period: Late Period
Provenance: From a family collection, acquired 1920s, and thence by descent.
Condition: Fine condition.

In stock

Product Code: ES-19162
Category: Tags: , ,

The Egyptians wore amulets alongside other pieces of jewellery. They were decorative, but also served a practical purpose, being considered to bestow power and protection upon the wearer. Many of the amulets have been found inside the wrappings of mummies, as they were used to prepare the deceased for the afterlife.

Thoth was an important Egyptian deity, who was often depicted as a man with the head of an ibis or baboon, as these were his sacred animals. He was responsible for knowledge, measurement, wisdom, and thought, and was also thought to have given the Egyptians their hieroglyphic writing.

Amulets held different meanings, depending on their type or form. Small amulets depicting gods and goddesses seem to have induced the protective powers of the deity. On the other hand, small representations of anatomical features or creatures suggest that the wearer required protection over a specific body part, or that he/she desired the skills of a particular animal. Amulets depicting animals were very common in the Old Kingdom Period, whilst representations of deities gained popularity in the Middle Kingdom. Perhaps this amulet aided the wearer in the afterlife, or endowed him/her with other attributes of Thoth, such as language and accuracy.

 

Weight 13.0 g
Dimensions L 4.0 cm
Egyptian Mythology

Culture

Region

Country

Stone

Reference: For similar see: The Walters Art Museum: Accession number 48.1547

You may also like…